How American Mass Media Poisons Us with Hate

O Society

Chris Hedges interviews Matt Taibbi  Truthdig edited by O Society June 11, 2019

In the latest episode of “On Contact,” host and Truthdig contributor Chris Hedges sits down with Matt Taibbi of Rolling Stone for a two-part series on American media, which Hedges calls a “purveyor of hate.” They explore the ways in which Fox News reshaped the media in its own image, and how networks like MSNBC came to tell viewers exactly what they want to hear. A portion of this segment is devoted to Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky’s Manufacturing Consent.

In “Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media,” published in 1988, Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky exposed the techniques that the commercial media used to promote and defend the economic, social and political agendas of the ruling elites. These techniques included portraying victims as either worthy or unworthy of sympathy.

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Time to give up on identity politics: It’s dragging the progressive agenda down

Outstanding analysis of identity politics and the dead end it invariably leads to.

O Society

Identity politics only served to disempower the left and fuel the rise of white nationalism. Can we move on?

by ANIS SHIVANI Salon

Race is the foundation of identity. I would say that that’s kind of a more touchy-feely version of this, but it’s maybe the most important one. We understand ourselves as coming from some place. We understand ourselves as being part of a bigger story. We’re part of Europe. We’re part of this big European story . . . this big narrative of who we are. We aren’t just individuals. We aren’t just some raceless, genderless soul or brain existing in the world, interacting with others. No, we have roots.
Richard Spencer interview, “The Future of the Alt-Right Under Trump,” Feb. 1, 2017

I didn’t come around to disliking identity politics recently. Long before the 2016 election, 15 years ago in fact, I predicted the…

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1500 + 1 Posts: A Woman Needs a Man Like a Fish Needs a Bicycle

O Society

by O Society August 1, 2019

Our conversation begins here regarding the idiom:

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

^ This ^ one sounds like an identity politics idiom to me because it has that “I’m a unique snowflake so respect my glitter” sound to it. Self-help becomes “self-esteem,” which is basically bullshit to tell you what you want to hear so you can “feel good.”

And when we investigate the quote, as done here, indeed we find this:

The self-help book “The Rhythm of Life: Living Every Day with Passion and Purpose” by Matthew Kelly contains a chapter titled “Everybody is a Genius” which begins:

Albert Einstein wrote, “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it…

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You Can’t Go Home Again: the Liberal State is No More

O Society

by Richard Moser Be Freedom Jan 25, 2019

In a previous article, I argued often confusing and divergent arguments within the neoliberal critique could be best understood as the tensions between two opposing currents of thought. One tendency understands neoliberalism as the unfettered reign of the free market, often called Free Market Fundamentalism (FMF); the other sees neoliberalism as the fusion of the corporation and the state, sometimes called Corporate Power.

If it’s FMF, what does that mean for activism? If it’s Corporate Power, what does that imply for strategy?

The greater the emphasis on FMF, the more possible it might seem to re-regulate the corporations back to within tolerable limits after recapturing the state through elections. The greater the emphasis on corporate power the less possible incremental (primarily) electoral approaches seem, and the more likely revolutionary measures will be required to abolish corporate power.

You Can’t Go Home Again

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Why Sci-Hub is the true solution for Open Access: reply to criticism

engineuring

This article is to reply to some points made by publishers as well as some librarians who don’t like what Sci-Hub is doing to their job now.

I will start with an article published last wekk by Ernesto Priego Signal, Not Solution: Notes on Why Sci-Hub Is Not Opening Access

The title is misleading by itself, if not funny. Sci-Hub is not a signal: for many researchers out there in the world, Sci-Hub is the only solution available to access articles. I can support my words by providing letters I received as well as some statistics, but I will do this in future posts. The problem are paywalls, and Sci-Hub is a tool that solves this problem. A signal is when someone talks about the problem of paywalls, like many OA advocates do. What differentiates Sci-Hub from this talk, is that Sci-Hub not talking, but actually solving this problem, providing access to those…

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The Time the ACLU Turned Its Back on Julian Bond

The Rancid Honeytrap

Knowing my interest in the accomplished awfulness of the ACLU, my pal Walter Glass put me onto this 2014 interview  with Black Civil Rights pioneer Julian Bond published earlier this month in Counterpunch. Bond was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and in 1965 among the first Black members elected to the Georgia House of Representatives following passage of the Voting Rights Act. However, the House voted not to seat him, ostensibly based on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Bond took the matter to court and lost, but a unanimous decision by the Supreme Court reversed the ruling.  Pretty serious, important stuff, right?  If you were an organization committed to civil liberties, you’d want to be on the right side of history, wouldn’t you? especially since the Georgia House’s decision was both unambiguously a violation of the First Amendment and tinged with racism. Well check this out from the interview:

Julian Bond: The ACLU wouldn’t support me…

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The Mainstream and the Margins: Noam Chomsky vs. Michael Parenti

All Chomsky fans need to read this…

Popaganda

Noam Chomsky is, as anyone reading this knows, a linguist, MIT professor, and the English-speaking world’s foremost radical dissident intellectual. Chomsky’s work in this latter capacity is so well-documented that it’s not necessary to recapitulate too much—however, a few choice high notes include decades of criticism of US foreign policy, some decent commentary on then-President-elect Barack Obama at a time nearly all of the Western commentariat had turned into a deranged Borg-like collective, and producing the second comprehensive study of corporate constraints on the media along with Edward Herman. As co-author of Manufacturing Consent, Chomsky provided a model illuminating the “political economy of the mass media,” and from this research came a great deal of very useful and incisive media criticism on issues like how concision and sound-bites help the status quo and why a journalist can be both genuine and compromised. Herman and Chomsky’s propaganda model purports…

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